Summer Programs

Summer Programs

  • A Taste of Arabic and Kiswahili

    In partnership with New Haven Public Schools, the Yale MacMillan Center Councils on African and Middle East Studies lead a free two-week summer language program for 30 rising 7th and 8th grade students. The program offers students a “taste” of the languages of Arabic and Kiswahili. Program instructors engage students in conversational practice as well as provide opportunities for students to learn about the cultures, foods, and geographies of these rarely-studied languages. 

    For more information, click HERE.

  • A Taste of Arabic and Kiswahili

    In partnership with New Haven Public Schools, the Yale MacMillan Center Councils on African and Middle East Studies lead a free two-week summer language program for 30 rising 7th and 8th grade students. The program offers students a “taste” of the languages of Arabic and Kiswahili. Program instructors engage students in conversational practice as well as provide opportunities for students to learn about the cultures, foods, and geographies of these rarely-studied languages. 

    For more information, click HERE.

  • Aspirations for Higher Learning

    The AFHL Pre-Collegiate Institute is a six-week summer program run by New Haven Public Schools and hosted by Yale, designed to motivate, prepare, and inspire students in grades 9–12 for college admissions and college success. The academic and career development focus is on science, mathematics, and written communication. Students are able to access many of the exciting learning programs on Yale’s campus and visit colleges and sites of career interest around Connecticut. Students receive 1.5 academic credits for successful completion of the program. 

  • Beinecke Summer Teacher Professional Development

    The Beinecke Library offers a summer curriculum development opportunity for New Haven high school teachers and librarians to explore highlights of the Beinecke’s collections, including the Langston Hughes papers, courtroom sketches from the Black Panthers trial in New Haven, Lewis and Clark’s expedition maps, and much more. With the support of Beinecke curators, staff, and graduate students, teachers utilize these primary sources to create lesson plans around a topic of their interest to teach the following year. 

    For more information, click HERE.

  • Citizens, Thinkers, Writers

    Citizens, Thinkers, Writers is a new two-week summer residential program for students from New Haven public schools who are interested in exploring fundamental human questions in a college setting. In small discussion seminars led by professors, students gain invaluable experience in close reading, analytic writing, and college-level discussion. During the program, students actively participate in a long-running philosophical conversation that dates back to ancient Greece and Rome and link this conversation to their own experiences as citizens of twenty-first-century New Haven. humanities.

    For more information, click HERE

  • Citizens, Thinkers, Writers: Reflecting on Civic Life

    welve rising seniors from the New Haven public schools will be invited to participate in the 2017 seminar, which will run from July 9th-21st. Two professors will lead the seminar, guiding students through discussions of thought-provoking texts by Plato, Thucydides, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Jane Addams, W.E.B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, Jr., Hannah Arendt, and others. The seminar discussions will focus on questions of enduring importance, linking historical writings on civic life to contemporary reflections on life in our city. What is the best way for individuals to live together in communities? How can citizens think critically about their societies? What basic agreements lie beneath our political communities, and what happens when those agreements are broken? What are the origins of ideals such as “freedom” and “equality” and what prevents us from achieving them?

    In addition to the daily seminar discussions, the students will be guided by three Yale undergraduate student residential teaching assistants and a graduate student program coordinator. The residential teaching assistants will organize supplementary workshops, help students with the analytic and writing skills essential for success at college and live in the residences with them. The graduate coordinator will oversee the program and offer additional advising, organize local field trips in the New Haven area and arrange explorations of additional resources on the Yale campus.

    The residential program aims to foster a small community of intellectually ambitious students that will outlast the two weeks of the seminar. The faculty, residential teaching assistants, and coordinator will remain in touch with the students through the 2017-18 academic year to support students in the process of applying to college.

    Applications are due March 15th.  To Apply: Click HERE!

     
  • CRISP High School Research Fellowship

    The CRISP High School Research Fellowship provides rising high school juniors and seniors with the opportunity to conduct team-based interdisciplinary materials science research. Participating students conduct a four-week research project as members of a research team that also includes university faculty and undergraduate and graduate students. 

    For more information, visit the CRISP website

  • Discovery to Cure High School Internship

    The program exposes students to laboratory research and promotes interest in science and medicine. Rising high school seniors spend six weeks working in a laboratory with a research scientist, utilizing research techniques such as gel electrophoresis, RTPCR, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Since its inception in 2003, a total of over 260 high school students, undergraduates, and high school teachers have successfully completed the Program. Several interns have presented their research at science fairs and approximately 20% of student interns have published their findings in peer-reviewed scientific journals. 

    For more information, visit the Discovery to Cure website

  • Morse Summer Music Academy

    The Morse Summer Music Academy provides comprehensive summer music instruction for nearly 150 accomplished student musicians from New Haven public schools. The program nurtures and develops creativity, musicianship, and musical leadership in students who are passionate about music. Parental involvement and continuing musical opportunities throughout the school year are hallmarks of the Academy. The program is open for application to students in 5th through 11th grades who sing or play piano, woodwind, brass, string, guitar, and percussion instruments. 

    For more information, visit the Music In Schools website

  • Pathways Summer Scholars Program

    Pathways Summer Scholars is a free two-week summer science day program for 100 rising 10th, 11th, and 12th grade Yale Pathways students. Each summer, Pathways Summer Scholars will have the opportunity to select from a variety of STEM workshops, collaboratively designed and taught by Yale faculty and graduate students. Summer 2016’s new workshop topics include, but are not limited to, green chemistry, web development and coding, neurobiology, consciousness, biochemistry, solar cell building, and more. Current Yale students serve as teaching assistants and mentors in the program. Rising Pathways seniors are also eligible to apply to the residential program, living in the Yale student dormitories, and taking part in college prep programming, in addition to attending STEM workshops during the day. For more information on Pathways to Science Summer Scholars Program and the application for Summer 2017 (due February 6th!), please go to: pathwayssummerscholars.yale.edu.

  • Shafer Family Scholarships for Yale University Summer Session

    Shafer Scholars are rising high school seniors who attend New Haven public schools and are nominated by their high school guidance counselors to enroll in a five-week Yale summer session program. A scholarship from the Shafer family of New Haven provides full tuition for two courses, room and board, a book allowance, and a stipend for each student. Students take Yale College courses in the company of college students and are able to earn college credits. Shafer Scholars live on campus in one of Yale’s residential colleges for the duration of their program and have the opportunity to participate in the co-curricular, recreational, and social programs with students from other high schools and colleges from across the country and the world.

  • Summer Buds

    Summer Buds is a literacy program started by Yale students through Dwight Hall in 2006. During the summer when school is out, Yale students stay active in volunteering by tutoring a group of middle-achieving students from John C. Daniels and Wexler-Grant Middle Schools in bi-weekly reading sessions at the New Haven Free Public Library. The “Bigs” and the “Littles” are paired up and select a book to read with each other, talk about the books and reactions to the stories with each other, and imagine alternative scenarios or place themselves within the context of the story. Bigs also assist the Littles in writing their reflections and interpretations of the stories in journals to work on reading comprehension and conceptualization.

    For more information, visit Dwight Hall’s website

  • Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)

    Yale School of Medicine serves as one of the twelve Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP) sites, a national program of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.  Yale SMDEP provides an intensive six week exposure to science, clinical medicine, and career counseling for motivated first and second year college students and graduates who are considering a career in medicine.  Approximately 80 students attend the Yale SMDEP each summer.

    For more information, visit the Yale SMDEP website

  • Summer Science Research Institute

    The Summer Science Research Institute (SSRI) connects highly qualified New Haven high school students with science research internships at Yale. During the summer, students participate in a series of workshops and activities to supplement their internship experiences and enhance their scientific research skills. Students are paired with Yale undergraduate mentors, who provide one-on-one guidance throughout the six-week internship experience.

    For more information, visit the SSRI website

  • Ulysses S. Grant Foundation

    The Ulysses S. Grant Foundation is a six-week academic summer program for talented and motivated middle school students from New Haven, held on the Yale University campus. Since 1953, U.S. Grant has drawn on the experience and enthusiasm of Yale undergraduates to challenge students so they can acquire the academic preparation and skills they will need to enter and succeed in college and excel in their current school environment.

  • Yale Center for Analytical Sciences Young Scholars Program

    The Young Scholars program brings together a collaborative group of 12-14 high school students, primarily from the greater New Haven area. For two weeks in the summer, students participate in an intensive introduction to Biostatistics, learn in a statistical modeling program known as “R,” and tour aspects of public health. Young Scholars provides an intensive, hands-on science curriculum that emphasizes discovery through lab tours, critical thinking and problem-solving, lunch lectures, as well as faculty led “R” programming sessions.

    For more information, visit the YCAS Young Scholars website

  • Yale Center for Health and Learning Games High School Summer Internship Program

    The Center for Health & Learning Games, which houses Yale’s play2PREVENT Lab, is made up of a multidisciplinary, highly collaborative team of researchers, videogame developers, and community partners dedicated to creating and evaluating videogame interventions for health, education, and social good in youth and young adults. During the five-week internship, students spend each morning in workshops on the use of video games in health research and participate in afternoon sessions featuring guest speakers from the Yale School of Medicine and the commercial video game sector. 

    For more information, click HERE

  • Yale Community Rowing

    Established in 1999, the Yale Community Rowing program now brings close to 900 students between the ages of ten and seventeen to Yale’s rowing facilities each summer for one week sessions ranging from the basic “Learn to Row” to more advanced programs for upper-middle and high school students. Programs are offered free of charge.

    For more information, visit the Yale Community Athletics website

  • Yale Daily News Summer Journalism Program

    Run by members of the Yale Daily News, the Summer Journalism Program is a one-week intensive course in journalism for high school students. Students participate in workshops on the fundamentals of reporting and writing, attend lectures by guest speakers from major national publications, and work hands-on reporting a story to together create a full summer edition of the Yale Daily News by the end of the week. The program is free and open to all Connecticut high school students.

    For more information, visit the Yale Daily News website

  • Yale Summer Debate Program

    Offered by the Urban Debate League, the weeklong Yale Summer Debate Program is open to all New Haven high school students, regardless of debate experience. During the program, students develop their skills in public speaking, constructing arguments, and delivering rebuttals. The program is premised on the philosophy that students can use debate as a tool to critically engage with the world around them, helping them to become better debaters, students, and more active members of society. 

    For more information, visit the Yale Urban Debate League website

  • Yale Summer Program in Astrophysics

    YSPA is a 4-week residential research and enrichment program for 32 rising high school juniors and seniors who are interested in math, science, computer programming, and other tech fields. Students take classes in physics, math, and astronomy, complete a scientific research project using telescopes at Yale, learn the basics of computer programming and data science, and present their results at the end of the program. YSPA has a small student-to-faculty ratio (32:6), so students get to know each other and the faculty very well.  

    For more information, please visit the YSPA website

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